gallery/four_fifty_miles_freedom_1601

Four-Fifty Miles to Freedom
Running length    =    06:51:25

Maurice Andrew Brackenreed JOHNSTON ( - ) and Kenneth Darlaston YEARSLEY (1892 - 1965)
Four-Fifty Miles to Freedom is the true but little known story of the escape of eight British Prisoners-of-War from a Turkish POW camp during the First World War. The story, written by two of the escapees, describes their life in the various POW camps in Turkey in which they were moved around, and then their well-planned and executed escape from the camp at Yozgad. They were then faced with a trek of over three hundred miles across arid deserts, and a mountain range, constantly searching for water, all the while attempting to avoid detection by soldiers and the local population. A further 120 miles of hostile ocean faced them when eventually reaching the coast before they eventually set foot on friendly soil. A 'boys own' story of derring-do and survival against all odds. A must listen-to story! Summary by Kevin Green

gallery/nurse_spy_in_the_union_army_1501

Nurse and Spy in the Union Army
Running Length    =    09:18:03

Sarah Emma EDMONDS (1841 - 1898)
The “Nurse and Spy” is simply a record of events which have transpired in the experience and under the observation of one who has been on the field and participated in numerous battles—among which are the first and second Bull Run, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, the Seven days in front of Richmond, Antietam, and Fredericksburg—serving in the capacity of “Spy” and as “Field Nurse” for over two years.

While in the “Secret Service” as a “Spy,” which is one of the most hazardous positions in the army—she penetrated the enemy’s lines, in various disguises, no less than eleven times; always with complete success and without detection.Her efficient labors in the different Hospitals as well as her arduous duties as “Field Nurse,” embrace many thrilling and touching incidents, which are here most graphically described. - Summary from the preface

gallery/over_the_top_1004

Over the Top
Running Length    =    7:04:16

Arthur Guy EMPEY (1883 - 1963)
Arthur Guy Empey was an American who responded to the sinking of the Lusitania by enlisting with the British Army to fight in France. His experiences in the trenches, including his ultimate wounding and convalescence, became this book. When published in 1917, it was a major hit and helped the recruiting effort when America entered the Great War. If you've heard of the horror of trench warfare in WWI and want to see it from below dirt level, Empey offers it all here.
Also included is Empey's popular "Tommy's Dictionary of the Trenches" which humorously demistifies the slang used by the British soldier.
 (Summary by Mark F. Smith)

 

gallery/roughriders_1503

The Rough Riders
Running Length    =    06:31:42

Theodore ROOSEVELT (1858 - 1919)
Theodore Roosevelt's personal account of The Rough Riders, the name affectionately bestowed on the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, one of three such regiments raised in 1898 for the Spanish-American War and the only one to see action. Roosevelt, serving first as Lt. Colonel and 2nd in command, gives a rousing depiction of the men and horses, equipment, talent, their trip to Cuba, battle strategies, losses, injuries and victories. He says: "In all the world there could be no better material for soldiers than that afforded by these grim hunters of the mountains, these wild rough riders of the plains . . accustomed to handling wild and savage horses . . to following the chase with the rifle, both for sport and as a means of livelihood . . they were hardened to life in the open, and to shifting for themselves under adverse circumstances . . My men were children of the dragon's blood, and if they had no outland foe to fight and no outlet for their vigorous and daring energy, there was always the chance of their fighting one another: but the great majority, if given the chance to do hard or dangerous work, availed themselves of it with the utmost eagerness." (Michele Fry)

gallery/running_blockade_1710

Running the Blockade
Running Length    =    03:45:56

Thomas E. TAYLOR (? - ?)
The first-person experiences and adventures of blockade runner during the American civil war. - Summary by Delmar H. Dolbier

gallery/army_life_in_a_black_regiment_1002

Army Life in a Black Regiment
Running Length    =    8:39:54

Thomas Wentworth HIGGINSON (1823 - 1911)
These pages record some of the adventures of the First South Carolina Volunteers, the first slave regiment mustered into the service of the United States during the late civil war. It was, indeed, the first colored regiment of any kind so mustered, except a portion of the troops raised by Major-General Butler at New Orleans. These scarcely belonged to the same class, however, being recruited from the free colored population of that city, a comparatively self-reliant and educated race. (From the text)

gallery/u_boat_hunters_1209

The U-boat Hunters
Running Length    =    5:06:33

James Brendan CONNOLLY (1868 - 1957)
The author takes the listener on a tour of various ships used in WW1. He discusses the boats and the seamen who occupy them and their encounters with the German U-boats. It is a collection of short stories, each one complete, about them all. The author was also an Olympic athlete; winning a bronze, silver and gold medal in the Athens Olympics of 1896 and a silver in the Paris games of 1900.(Summary by wtomcho )

gallery/between_lines_1306

Between the Lines
Running Length    =    5:51:39

Boyd CABLE (1878 - 1943)
This book, all of which has been written at the Front within sound of the German guns and for the most part within shell and rifle range, is an attempt to tell something of the manner of struggle that has gone on for months between the lines along the Western Front, and more especially of what lies behind and goes to the making of those curt and vague terms in the war communiqués. I think that our people at Home will be glad to know more, and ought to know more, of what these bald phrases may actually signify, when, in the other sense, we read 'between the lines.' (Summary by Boyd Cable)

 

gallery/now_can_be_told_1406
gallery/chancellorsville_and_gettysburg_1209
gallery/rebels_recollections_1605

Now It Can Be Told
Running Time    =    19:00:34

Philip GIBBS (1877 - 1962)
In this book I have written about some aspects of the war which, I believe, the world must know and remember, not only as a memorial of men's courage in tragic years, but as a warning of what will happen again--surely--if a heritage of evil and of folly is not cut out of the hearts of peoples. Here it is the reality of modern warfare not only as it appears to British soldiers, of whom I can tell, but to soldiers on all the fronts where conditions were the same...

The purpose of this book is to get deeper into the truth of this war and of all war--not by a more detailed narrative of events, but rather as the truth was revealed to the minds of men, in many aspects, out of their experience; and by a plain statement of realities, however painful, to add something to the world's knowledge out of which men of good-will may try to shape some new system of relationship between one people and another, some new code of international morality, preventing or at least postponing another massacre of youth like that five years' sacrifice of boys of which I was a witness.

Chancellorsville and Gettysburg
Running Length    =    6:46:28

Abner DOUBLEDAY (1819 - 1893)
Abner Doubleday began the Civil War as a Union officer and aimed the first cannon shot in response to the bombardment opened on Ft. Sumter in 1861. Two years later, after a series of battles (including Antietam, where he was wounded), Doubleday took over a division in the Army of the Potomac's 1st Corps.
This book is in part Doubleday's revenge, as he picks apart Meade's indecision after the battle was essentially won, with the repulse of the famous Pickett's Charge. In his view, Meade could have won the war at that moment. (Summary by Mark Smith)

A Rebel's Recollections
Running Length    =    05:32:24

George EGGLESTON (1839 - 1911)
George Cary Eggleston's Civil War memoir begins with a separate essay on the living conditions and political opinions of Virginia’s citizenry before secession. The body of the work contains vivid descriptions and accounts of the men and women of the South during the time of the Confederacy. Eggleston praises its war heroes, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, and Jeb Stuart, but is highly critical of Jefferson Davis and of his government’s inefficiencies, red-tape, and favoritism. The book concludes with the war's end and a tribute to the character of the newly freed slaves. This informative and engaging work, much of which appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, enjoyed great popularity throughout the country. Originally published in 1874, it went through four editions by 1905. ( Lee Smalley)